Channeling Grandma: A Collection of 75 Country Dessert Recipes

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Contents

  1. Pink Guava: Our guide to this tasty pink tropical fruit!
  2. New England Today
  3. Times Grandparents Made Life More Interesting | Bored Panda

John London, England How it happened: Chef Fergus Henderson is known as one of the founding fathers of the nose-to-tail movement that is, using up every last bit of the animal. Since St. But it was too early to open another restaurant. The dish was an instant hit. Why it's important: Matsuhisa may have been already been a great sushi chef, but Nobu -- with its club atmosphere and celebrity sightings paired with dishes like the miso black cod -- helped propel him to becoming a household name.

The dish helped further what Japanese cooking could look like in America, with more and more chefs learning to embrace ingredients like miso. Year: Restaurant: The French Laundry Yountville, California How it happened: When a then-relatively unknown chef named Thomas Keller took over a Napa Valley farmhouse in and morphed it into a tasting menu-only restaurant, he did so with a wink and a smile, serving playfully named tiny courses like Coffee and Doughnuts cinnamon-sugar donuts served with cappuccino custard topped with foamed milk and a stunning opener of Oysters and Pearls, pearl tapioca sabayon with Island Creek oysters and white sturgeon caviar.

As you get older those moments become rarer. The most common theory surrounding their origin credits a chef outside of Shanghai, who in wanted to make a different kind of dumpling, one plump with hot soup and pork. It steadily garnered fame, gaining popularity in Taipei with the opening of Din Tai Fung, now arguably the planet's premier soup dumpling destination.

Now there are dyed versions, versions wiggling with matzo ball soup, and even mammoth ones the size of a softball , which can only be attacked with a straw and a fork. Regardless of which route you go, you can thank Joe's for importing these bursting bundles of liquid magic Stateside. Year: Restaurant: Magnolia Bakery New York, New York How it happened: Whether you blame it on Sex and the City or their undeniable cuteness factor, Magnolia cupcakes were the "it" dessert at the turn of the century: the perfect individual portion of sweet cake crowned with an even sweeter, pastel swirl of frosting.

Back in , partners Allysa Torey and Jennifer Appel had extra batter after baking a cake and rather than waste it, poured the remaining cake into muffin tin molds, and voila: cupcakes. Not everyone can buy Manolo Blahniks, but everyone can afford a cupcake. Year: Restaurant: The Slanted Door San Francisco, California How it happened: Before it was the sleek, well-oiled Ferry Building machine it is now, and before the Mission was overrun with hipsters and tech millionaires, The Slanted Door was a postage stamp of a restaurant opened in an old kitchen cabinet store.

There, chef Charles Phan, who was born in Vietnam, was taking the home-style dishes of his homeland and marrying them with Northern California ingredients. His Shaking Beef, so named for the shaking of the pan when preparing it, was and is the perfect example: Instead of the flank steak used in Vietnam, Phan chose Niman Ranch filet. To make it, cubes of filet are seared along with garlic and onions in a soy and fish sauce vinaigrette, then served with a lime-spiked salt-and-pepper dipping sauce. Despite a flashier venue, the dish is still on the menu to this day.

Since then, the approach is found in cuisines ranging from Indian to Thai, but back in , it was as revolutionary as waiting for a table in the Mission. This venture, with then-new partner Joe Bastianich, was packed with grander intentions -- and even more rebellious style. But the unconventional touches made it shine: the one-two punch of garlic and red onion a uniquely Batali twist.

The result? The DB Burger: a sirloin patty stuffed with tender short ribs braised in red wine, plus foie gras, a mirepoix of root vegetables, and preserved black truffle. Add to that oven roasted tomato confit, fresh tomato, red onions, and frisee on a homemade toasted Parmesan and poppy seed bun smeared with horseradish.

It was a new kind of comfort food. The dish caused other restaurateurs, and also home cooks, to think about using off cuts, while reviving the art of braising.


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It became so popular that in his book, Craft of Cooking , Colicchio said he was going through pounds of short ribs a week. Thanks to him, too, the once-cheap cut is not so cheap anymore. The couple has also inspired a generation of bakers who put the same level of care into a croissant or a loaf of bread as chefs do into a perfectly cooked steak. Year: Restaurant: Ottolenghi London, England How it happened: When chef Yotam Ottolenghi opened his namesake delicatessen in London, he went out of his way to highlight vegetables -- combining ingredients from his Israeli roots combined with local British produce.

One of the early standouts on the menu was roasted eggplant salad, roasted hard to create a char on the skin and flesh, and then topped with a yogurt sauce and a flourish of pomegranate seeds. The dish was a pared-down reflection of his upbringing in Jerusalem, and summers spent in Italy, where vegetables, not meat, was the star of the dish. Londoners flocked to the deli to try vegetable-forward dishes that combined textures, colors and Middle Eastern flavors in ways the city had not seen before.

GIANT OREO CAKE RECIPE Prepared By My GRANNY - Oreo Biscuit cake - asmr video - veg village food

Ottolenghi became so synonymous with this new way of thinking about vegetables that he was recruited by The Guardian in to write a column called "The New Vegetarian" where he shared recipes from his restaurants. He has since expanded his Ottolenghi empire to include several cookbooks, a full-service restaurant, and five delis across London. Even more difficult to imagine?

A doughnut landscape where the majority of shops didn't carry a bacon maple bar. They also debuted before the peak of the bacon obsession of the early aughts. But the bacon maple bar itself led to a boom of bacon maple everything. He reduced the breakfast dish to its barest elements -- a schmear of poached yolk, a deep-fried, muffin-crumb-crusted hollandaise bound with hydrocolloids once unheard of in a restaurant kitchen, a glassine strip of Canadian bacon -- and it did nothing but blow minds.

Once he and his team figured out how to fry it without scrambling the eggs, they moved on to other emulsified sauces. For example, plums, sealed in a plastic bag with salt get the lacto-fermented treatment in this Noma fermentation video. It's just incredibly delicious. Agenda-setting chefs are getting in on the action. David Chang has his own fermentation lab , while Jessica Koslow of Sqirl makes lacto-fermented hot sauce for her famous grain bowls. This method of pickling is now found on menus across the country.

Year: Restaurant: Momofuku Noodle Bar New York, New York How it happened: David Chang is arguably one of the most famous chefs alive today, but back in , he was a first-time restaurateur trying to make his mark on New York City with a playful approach to Asian cooking.

One of the early standouts from his menu at Noodle Bar in the East Village was a style of pork bun called gua bao , or steamed bao that has long been a staple in Taiwanese food markets. In order to make it his own, Chang had to do some research and testing. He found a steamed bun producer in Brooklyn to produce the soft, chewy, textured buns that are crucial to the dish. He then tested and perfected a recipe for the pork belly, a recipe that requires the pork to be cured in salt and sugar for 24 hours and then roasted at a slow temperature for a few hours.

The pork belly bun is still one of Noodle Bar's most popular dishes to date. Why it's important: The pork belly bun itself is not new, but the way that Chang used it to create his own brand of food heralded a different era of fine dining techniques applied to simple dishes. The pork is a heritage breed, and it went through months of testing to make sure that it was absolutely right.

Pork belly was also not so commonly found on restaurant menus, but chefs started paying attention to the fatty cut again thanks to Chang. Ramen is now everywhere in the United States. Before Momofuku, "ramen" meant the cheap instant noodles beloved by college students everywhere.

Now, it's come to represent big bowls of slurpable noodles in flavor-packed broths. His ideas, including Hot-N-Ready, were way ahead of their time. In a pizza war, it seems, there are no losers. In the US, there was Alinea, where dishes were made with volcano vaporizers and presented with smoldering rosemary sprigs.

To eat the dish, diners had to remove the pin holding aloft the other elements, which would then fall into the hot soup, creating a melange of temperatures with each bite. When food was scarce, they could be rehydrated and eaten. These potatoes really looked like the stones you can see in the rivers. Can I really eat it? But one dish, which Ricker learned while traveling in Vietnam, really blew minds. Developed in the s, the process of spherification involves blending sodium alginate into a given liquid, which is then dropped into a solution of calcium chloride, forming a skin-thin membrane around the droplets.

Simple as it seems, it was a long time in development. Gill in his review. The olive helped propel molecular gastronomy to a respected and coveted place in the haute cooking world, with chefs tripping over themselves to learn the tricks. While playing with a number of raw vegetable salads, then-chef Joshua McFadden cut a bunch of kale into thin ribbons and dressed it simply with olive oil, lemon, garlic, chili flakes, pecorino Romano, and a blitz of dried bread crumbs.

Kale chips. Kale cupcakes. The humble green is now ubiquitous on our plates and on our Pinterest feeds. While working as the pastry chef for the burgeoning Momofuku restaurant empire, Tosi needed to make a simple dessert for the Ko tasting menu. She was inspired by the cereal aisle as she walked through a bodega, remembering that she only liked the milk when it was sweetened with cereal.

Tosi created a cereal milk panna cotta by toasting corn flakes and steeping it in milk with some brown sugar and salt to "round out the flavors. Tosi went on to transform the cereal milk base into a mega-popular soft serve flavor that she now sells at every Milk Bar location. Why it's important: While Tosi has a background working in high-end kitchens, her tastes have always been more populist.

While other pastry chefs were off on in search for the finest of dark chocolates and more exclusive of vanilla beans, Tosi spent her time drawing inspiration for her favorite snacks that could all basically be found in the junk food aisle of a grocery store. The result is a dessert empire unlike anything else built on a foundation of cereal milk ice cream, Crack Pies, and naked birthday cakes.

Her style and flavors are often copied with even chains like Burger King attempting to mimic her creations. Now reopen after a fire, the lines persist, and waiting has become an essential part of many die-hard food lovers' bucket lists. Pitmasters have been manning their briskets for generations in Texas, but Franklin started cutting his meat just as internet food culture was heating up, and word traveled fast.

Year: Restaurant: Kogi Los Angeles, California How it happened: Roy Choi is now the author of a cookbook, the owner of multiple restaurants across Los Angeles, and has served as an advisor on a feature Hollywood film, but none of that would have happened with Kogi. Choi -- who trained at the Culinary Institute of America and worked in prestigious kitchens around the country -- returned back to Los Angeles to cook. He wanted to open his own restaurant that fused all the pieces of him together, especially his upbringing in an immigrant Korean family and his love for Los Angeles, the city he grew up in.

So he created Kogi, a food truck where he combined Korean barbecue and tacos. Why it's important: Choi is largely considered to be one of the founders of the food truck movement, helping to create a mobile dining culture. The Kogi team was one of the first to use social media to help grow their following, tweeting out the locations of the trucks so that fans knew where they would be setting up for the day. This way, Choi also got to feed the whole city of LA, going to communities where the food he was cooking might not be available.

Choi is also responsible showing the world how well Korean and Mexican food can blend together, carving a path for other entrepreneurs to spread the culinary mashup to other cities. It started at his country home in Westchester County, New York. And toast is a comfort food. One of the most prized varietals was Carolina Gold, a long grain rice coveted for its versatility, clean flavor, and lush texture.

Over time, however, growers switched to other types of rice, nearly forgetting Carolina Gold -- until the s, when passionate seed-saver Glenn Roberts revived the staple under his company Anson Mills.

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Pink Guava: Our guide to this tasty pink tropical fruit!

Roberts quickly attracted the attention of Charleston chef Sean Brock. A Virginia country boy by origin, Brock grew up immersed in agricultural tradition. Working closely with Roberts, Brock incorporated Carolina Gold into a number of dishes when he launched his restaurant, Husk, in , including rice pudding. In doing so, he helps ensure that these storied dishes remain part of the cultural conversation. Reports and rumors of the stunt-tastic cheese and bacon sandwich that swapped fried chicken patties for bread had been seeping through food blogs and national outlets for years during its testing phase , but in the spring of , the Double Down was officially unleashed, and people went bonkers.

John Linn of the Palm Beach New Times said people were both "incensed" and "enticed" by the sandwich's egregiousness. One think piece-happy conservative blogger even tried to chalk its existence up to the Recession.


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At any rate, KFC certainly snubbed their finger-lickin' noses at any and all semblance of health consciousness, and pulled out every stop in their breaded arsenal to facilitate a food moment that would create an unprecedented amount of buzz. Why it's important: The amount of sheer public outcry and light-hearted outrage alone is one of the most memorable and influential moments of fast food history this century. It helped create a subset of food stunting that KFC may not have perfected, but certainly lubricated with their gut-busting Frankenfood.

David Cho, writing for The Awl , might have said it best: "America, we did it! We, like the Double Down, are pretty much exactly what people think we are. And honestly, it did taste pretty good, too. Just admit it. Year: Restaurant: Dinner by Heston Blumenthal London, England How it happened: Chicken liver and foie gras mousse is a recipe that dates back centuries, so when chef Ashley Palmer-Watts and Heston Blumenthal thought about adding it to the menu, they knew they had to find a way to make it modern.

Why it's important: The meat fruit dish shows old school dishes can be updated using new techniques and diners can still be surprised by the dishes that they thought they knew. When Koslow opened Sqirl in , she initially planned on using the space to make artisanal jams and hold the occasional class, she said.

But paying the rent with jars of rhubarb and kumquat jam was tough, so she added a small cafe to the space with in-your-face and highly Instagrammable breakfast options. The most popular? Why it's important: Koslow is the not the first person to put fancy toast on a restaurant menu, but she is the person who helped the trend to land. Because it is so simple, the toast puts an emphasis on ingredients -- and Koslow refuses to use anything but the best.

So the next time you see a photogenic piece of toast on the menu at your local coffee shop, say a little thank you to Koslow before you put it up on Instagram. Year: Restaurant: Mission Chinese San Francisco, California How it happened: Danny Bowien was thinking about giving up cooking entirely until he had his first bite of real Sichuan mapo tofu. So, fittingly, it was the first dish he wanted to crack when Mission Chinese was opening in San Francisco.

Without the aid of a mentor or YouTube video tutorials on how to make it, Bowien parlayed techniques he learned from his background in an Italian kitchen -- the base was a Bolognese -- into a ingredient behemoth of a recipe that he would tweak incessantly. On Bowien's season of Mind of a Chef , he cooks a version of his mapo tofu with lamb for a small consortium of renowned Chinese chefs who resoundingly approve of his non-traditional take. But when Bottura saw the destruction, he declared it beautiful. Everyone in the kitchen stopped as he framed it with his hands and compared it to a painting.

Since the night of that fortuitous accident all lemon tarts now arrive at the tables deliberately smashed, illuminating unexpectedly exquisite imperfection. Chefs are continually driven to experiment and impress, and obsessing over presentation is part of the high-pressure process. The Oops! I Dropped the Lemon Tart invites chefs and diners to discover splendor in flaws and remind that soulful cooking should always outshine artifices. Chefs and restaurants started celebrating flawed dishes.

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Year: Restaurant: Taco Bell Irvine, California How it happened: In , as the chain approached its 50th anniversary, CEO Greg Creed issued a modest challenge to his team: reinvent the crunchy taco just in time for the half-century celebration in From day one, a singular idea from their initial brainstorming session -- seemingly hatched from the mind of a stoned teenager with too much time and a well-stocked pantry -- stood out.

It took over 40 iterations before they augmented the chip's DNA enough to land the right level of crunch, strength, and tactile cheese dust. But, as we all know, they nailed it. Why it's important: Don't call it a "stunt food. The Doritos Locos Taco helped redefine how the company innovates its menu, and raised the cheese dust-covered bar for every other fast food brand looking to make a splash with an eye-popping menu aberration or cross-brand collaboration.

A staffer suggested he make a donut. So far, he has come up with unique flavors. When is the last time you saw someone line-up at 4am for a pastry? When was the last time you saw people line up every day for the past five years straight for a pastry? Ansel inadvertently invented the hybrid pastry to launch all future hybrid pastries.

From there, I added the Boursin cheese, which was my own personal touch. That makes all the difference. Squires Photo: Courtesy of Petit Trois. But when he announced that the menu was going to be made entirely of food scraps, the world had to pay attention. For the pop-up, Barber and his team contacted a cold juice processor and realized that the company was throwing away the pulp after making juices.

The dish was a hit. The process was a learning experience for Barber about the many different aspects of the food chain and the potential for restaurant kitchens to address food waste. Barber and his team had to get creative and bring other parts of the food world into the conversation. The juice pulp burger, in particular, showed the potential for food waste to be re-imagined and utilized in home and restaurant kitchens.

To say it blew up would be an understatement -- the social video has racked up more than 72 million views on Facebook. Lines wrapped around the corners of The Bagel Store's two Williamsburg locations after the video went live, and the demand became so intense that it forced Rossillo to close one of the shops indefinitely to renovate it's since reopened, but it's no longer an "official" purveyor of the Rainbow Bagel. Nickatina11 Report. MehmetYildiraz Report. MichaellaJane Report. Laughhatcher Report. Bored Panda works better on our iPhone app. Please enter email address We will not spam you.

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We and our trusted partners use technology such as cookies on our site to personalize content and ads, provide social media features, and analyze our traffic. You can read more about it and change your preferences here. Facebook Pinterest Twitter. Final score:. Nicola Morley 1 year ago I wish my bank gave me these perks, where do i go to switch? Jeeves 1 year ago She's 69 and she made that? Well done Grandma! Bored Phoenix 1 year ago It's cool she found a face that fits!

I won' t do it again Yes Ma' am Catherine Marshall 1 year ago Too funny. Every day is Caturday 4. Molly Block 1 year ago Why isn't this photo more popular? Catherine Marshall 1 year ago And you wore it! Jeeves 1 year ago Her butter dish is single-handly more high-tech than my grandma's entire household. Elise 1 year ago cosplay time. Jeeves 1 year ago Well done Grandma!! This Is Her Profile Picture. Sandevil Sandh 1 year ago cool grandma.. The Cat Might Disagree. Neeraj Jha 1 year ago While showing your birthday message, cat is already drafting your eulogy in mind I Can't Stop Laughing, Lol.

Bored Phoenix 1 year ago They can't stand the rips. So Damn Thoughtful. John London, England How it happened: Chef Fergus Henderson is known as one of the founding fathers of the nose-to-tail movement that is, using up every last bit of the animal. Since St. But it was too early to open another restaurant. The dish was an instant hit. Why it's important: Matsuhisa may have been already been a great sushi chef, but Nobu -- with its club atmosphere and celebrity sightings paired with dishes like the miso black cod -- helped propel him to becoming a household name.

The dish helped further what Japanese cooking could look like in America, with more and more chefs learning to embrace ingredients like miso. Year: Restaurant: The French Laundry Yountville, California How it happened: When a then-relatively unknown chef named Thomas Keller took over a Napa Valley farmhouse in and morphed it into a tasting menu-only restaurant, he did so with a wink and a smile, serving playfully named tiny courses like Coffee and Doughnuts cinnamon-sugar donuts served with cappuccino custard topped with foamed milk and a stunning opener of Oysters and Pearls, pearl tapioca sabayon with Island Creek oysters and white sturgeon caviar.

New England Today

As you get older those moments become rarer. The most common theory surrounding their origin credits a chef outside of Shanghai, who in wanted to make a different kind of dumpling, one plump with hot soup and pork. It steadily garnered fame, gaining popularity in Taipei with the opening of Din Tai Fung, now arguably the planet's premier soup dumpling destination. Now there are dyed versions, versions wiggling with matzo ball soup, and even mammoth ones the size of a softball , which can only be attacked with a straw and a fork.

Regardless of which route you go, you can thank Joe's for importing these bursting bundles of liquid magic Stateside. Year: Restaurant: Magnolia Bakery New York, New York How it happened: Whether you blame it on Sex and the City or their undeniable cuteness factor, Magnolia cupcakes were the "it" dessert at the turn of the century: the perfect individual portion of sweet cake crowned with an even sweeter, pastel swirl of frosting. Back in , partners Allysa Torey and Jennifer Appel had extra batter after baking a cake and rather than waste it, poured the remaining cake into muffin tin molds, and voila: cupcakes.

Not everyone can buy Manolo Blahniks, but everyone can afford a cupcake. Year: Restaurant: The Slanted Door San Francisco, California How it happened: Before it was the sleek, well-oiled Ferry Building machine it is now, and before the Mission was overrun with hipsters and tech millionaires, The Slanted Door was a postage stamp of a restaurant opened in an old kitchen cabinet store.

There, chef Charles Phan, who was born in Vietnam, was taking the home-style dishes of his homeland and marrying them with Northern California ingredients. His Shaking Beef, so named for the shaking of the pan when preparing it, was and is the perfect example: Instead of the flank steak used in Vietnam, Phan chose Niman Ranch filet.

To make it, cubes of filet are seared along with garlic and onions in a soy and fish sauce vinaigrette, then served with a lime-spiked salt-and-pepper dipping sauce. Despite a flashier venue, the dish is still on the menu to this day. Since then, the approach is found in cuisines ranging from Indian to Thai, but back in , it was as revolutionary as waiting for a table in the Mission. This venture, with then-new partner Joe Bastianich, was packed with grander intentions -- and even more rebellious style. But the unconventional touches made it shine: the one-two punch of garlic and red onion a uniquely Batali twist.

The result? The DB Burger: a sirloin patty stuffed with tender short ribs braised in red wine, plus foie gras, a mirepoix of root vegetables, and preserved black truffle. Add to that oven roasted tomato confit, fresh tomato, red onions, and frisee on a homemade toasted Parmesan and poppy seed bun smeared with horseradish.

It was a new kind of comfort food. The dish caused other restaurateurs, and also home cooks, to think about using off cuts, while reviving the art of braising. It became so popular that in his book, Craft of Cooking , Colicchio said he was going through pounds of short ribs a week. Thanks to him, too, the once-cheap cut is not so cheap anymore.

The couple has also inspired a generation of bakers who put the same level of care into a croissant or a loaf of bread as chefs do into a perfectly cooked steak. Year: Restaurant: Ottolenghi London, England How it happened: When chef Yotam Ottolenghi opened his namesake delicatessen in London, he went out of his way to highlight vegetables -- combining ingredients from his Israeli roots combined with local British produce.

One of the early standouts on the menu was roasted eggplant salad, roasted hard to create a char on the skin and flesh, and then topped with a yogurt sauce and a flourish of pomegranate seeds. The dish was a pared-down reflection of his upbringing in Jerusalem, and summers spent in Italy, where vegetables, not meat, was the star of the dish.

Londoners flocked to the deli to try vegetable-forward dishes that combined textures, colors and Middle Eastern flavors in ways the city had not seen before. Ottolenghi became so synonymous with this new way of thinking about vegetables that he was recruited by The Guardian in to write a column called "The New Vegetarian" where he shared recipes from his restaurants.

He has since expanded his Ottolenghi empire to include several cookbooks, a full-service restaurant, and five delis across London. Even more difficult to imagine? A doughnut landscape where the majority of shops didn't carry a bacon maple bar.

Times Grandparents Made Life More Interesting | Bored Panda

They also debuted before the peak of the bacon obsession of the early aughts. But the bacon maple bar itself led to a boom of bacon maple everything. He reduced the breakfast dish to its barest elements -- a schmear of poached yolk, a deep-fried, muffin-crumb-crusted hollandaise bound with hydrocolloids once unheard of in a restaurant kitchen, a glassine strip of Canadian bacon -- and it did nothing but blow minds.

Once he and his team figured out how to fry it without scrambling the eggs, they moved on to other emulsified sauces. For example, plums, sealed in a plastic bag with salt get the lacto-fermented treatment in this Noma fermentation video. It's just incredibly delicious. Agenda-setting chefs are getting in on the action.

David Chang has his own fermentation lab , while Jessica Koslow of Sqirl makes lacto-fermented hot sauce for her famous grain bowls. This method of pickling is now found on menus across the country. Year: Restaurant: Momofuku Noodle Bar New York, New York How it happened: David Chang is arguably one of the most famous chefs alive today, but back in , he was a first-time restaurateur trying to make his mark on New York City with a playful approach to Asian cooking.

One of the early standouts from his menu at Noodle Bar in the East Village was a style of pork bun called gua bao , or steamed bao that has long been a staple in Taiwanese food markets. In order to make it his own, Chang had to do some research and testing. He found a steamed bun producer in Brooklyn to produce the soft, chewy, textured buns that are crucial to the dish.

He then tested and perfected a recipe for the pork belly, a recipe that requires the pork to be cured in salt and sugar for 24 hours and then roasted at a slow temperature for a few hours. The pork belly bun is still one of Noodle Bar's most popular dishes to date. Why it's important: The pork belly bun itself is not new, but the way that Chang used it to create his own brand of food heralded a different era of fine dining techniques applied to simple dishes.

The pork is a heritage breed, and it went through months of testing to make sure that it was absolutely right. Pork belly was also not so commonly found on restaurant menus, but chefs started paying attention to the fatty cut again thanks to Chang. Ramen is now everywhere in the United States. Before Momofuku, "ramen" meant the cheap instant noodles beloved by college students everywhere. Now, it's come to represent big bowls of slurpable noodles in flavor-packed broths. His ideas, including Hot-N-Ready, were way ahead of their time. In a pizza war, it seems, there are no losers.

In the US, there was Alinea, where dishes were made with volcano vaporizers and presented with smoldering rosemary sprigs. To eat the dish, diners had to remove the pin holding aloft the other elements, which would then fall into the hot soup, creating a melange of temperatures with each bite. When food was scarce, they could be rehydrated and eaten. These potatoes really looked like the stones you can see in the rivers. Can I really eat it? But one dish, which Ricker learned while traveling in Vietnam, really blew minds. Developed in the s, the process of spherification involves blending sodium alginate into a given liquid, which is then dropped into a solution of calcium chloride, forming a skin-thin membrane around the droplets.

Simple as it seems, it was a long time in development. Gill in his review. The olive helped propel molecular gastronomy to a respected and coveted place in the haute cooking world, with chefs tripping over themselves to learn the tricks. While playing with a number of raw vegetable salads, then-chef Joshua McFadden cut a bunch of kale into thin ribbons and dressed it simply with olive oil, lemon, garlic, chili flakes, pecorino Romano, and a blitz of dried bread crumbs.

Kale chips. Kale cupcakes. The humble green is now ubiquitous on our plates and on our Pinterest feeds. While working as the pastry chef for the burgeoning Momofuku restaurant empire, Tosi needed to make a simple dessert for the Ko tasting menu. She was inspired by the cereal aisle as she walked through a bodega, remembering that she only liked the milk when it was sweetened with cereal.

Tosi created a cereal milk panna cotta by toasting corn flakes and steeping it in milk with some brown sugar and salt to "round out the flavors. Tosi went on to transform the cereal milk base into a mega-popular soft serve flavor that she now sells at every Milk Bar location. Why it's important: While Tosi has a background working in high-end kitchens, her tastes have always been more populist. While other pastry chefs were off on in search for the finest of dark chocolates and more exclusive of vanilla beans, Tosi spent her time drawing inspiration for her favorite snacks that could all basically be found in the junk food aisle of a grocery store.

The result is a dessert empire unlike anything else built on a foundation of cereal milk ice cream, Crack Pies, and naked birthday cakes. Her style and flavors are often copied with even chains like Burger King attempting to mimic her creations. Now reopen after a fire, the lines persist, and waiting has become an essential part of many die-hard food lovers' bucket lists. Pitmasters have been manning their briskets for generations in Texas, but Franklin started cutting his meat just as internet food culture was heating up, and word traveled fast.

Year: Restaurant: Kogi Los Angeles, California How it happened: Roy Choi is now the author of a cookbook, the owner of multiple restaurants across Los Angeles, and has served as an advisor on a feature Hollywood film, but none of that would have happened with Kogi. Choi -- who trained at the Culinary Institute of America and worked in prestigious kitchens around the country -- returned back to Los Angeles to cook. He wanted to open his own restaurant that fused all the pieces of him together, especially his upbringing in an immigrant Korean family and his love for Los Angeles, the city he grew up in.

So he created Kogi, a food truck where he combined Korean barbecue and tacos. Why it's important: Choi is largely considered to be one of the founders of the food truck movement, helping to create a mobile dining culture. The Kogi team was one of the first to use social media to help grow their following, tweeting out the locations of the trucks so that fans knew where they would be setting up for the day.

This way, Choi also got to feed the whole city of LA, going to communities where the food he was cooking might not be available. Choi is also responsible showing the world how well Korean and Mexican food can blend together, carving a path for other entrepreneurs to spread the culinary mashup to other cities.

It started at his country home in Westchester County, New York. And toast is a comfort food. One of the most prized varietals was Carolina Gold, a long grain rice coveted for its versatility, clean flavor, and lush texture. Over time, however, growers switched to other types of rice, nearly forgetting Carolina Gold -- until the s, when passionate seed-saver Glenn Roberts revived the staple under his company Anson Mills. Roberts quickly attracted the attention of Charleston chef Sean Brock. A Virginia country boy by origin, Brock grew up immersed in agricultural tradition.

Working closely with Roberts, Brock incorporated Carolina Gold into a number of dishes when he launched his restaurant, Husk, in , including rice pudding. In doing so, he helps ensure that these storied dishes remain part of the cultural conversation. Reports and rumors of the stunt-tastic cheese and bacon sandwich that swapped fried chicken patties for bread had been seeping through food blogs and national outlets for years during its testing phase , but in the spring of , the Double Down was officially unleashed, and people went bonkers.

John Linn of the Palm Beach New Times said people were both "incensed" and "enticed" by the sandwich's egregiousness. One think piece-happy conservative blogger even tried to chalk its existence up to the Recession. At any rate, KFC certainly snubbed their finger-lickin' noses at any and all semblance of health consciousness, and pulled out every stop in their breaded arsenal to facilitate a food moment that would create an unprecedented amount of buzz. Why it's important: The amount of sheer public outcry and light-hearted outrage alone is one of the most memorable and influential moments of fast food history this century.

It helped create a subset of food stunting that KFC may not have perfected, but certainly lubricated with their gut-busting Frankenfood. David Cho, writing for The Awl , might have said it best: "America, we did it! We, like the Double Down, are pretty much exactly what people think we are. And honestly, it did taste pretty good, too. Just admit it.

Year: Restaurant: Dinner by Heston Blumenthal London, England How it happened: Chicken liver and foie gras mousse is a recipe that dates back centuries, so when chef Ashley Palmer-Watts and Heston Blumenthal thought about adding it to the menu, they knew they had to find a way to make it modern. Why it's important: The meat fruit dish shows old school dishes can be updated using new techniques and diners can still be surprised by the dishes that they thought they knew.

When Koslow opened Sqirl in , she initially planned on using the space to make artisanal jams and hold the occasional class, she said. But paying the rent with jars of rhubarb and kumquat jam was tough, so she added a small cafe to the space with in-your-face and highly Instagrammable breakfast options. The most popular? Why it's important: Koslow is the not the first person to put fancy toast on a restaurant menu, but she is the person who helped the trend to land.

Because it is so simple, the toast puts an emphasis on ingredients -- and Koslow refuses to use anything but the best. So the next time you see a photogenic piece of toast on the menu at your local coffee shop, say a little thank you to Koslow before you put it up on Instagram. Year: Restaurant: Mission Chinese San Francisco, California How it happened: Danny Bowien was thinking about giving up cooking entirely until he had his first bite of real Sichuan mapo tofu. So, fittingly, it was the first dish he wanted to crack when Mission Chinese was opening in San Francisco. Without the aid of a mentor or YouTube video tutorials on how to make it, Bowien parlayed techniques he learned from his background in an Italian kitchen -- the base was a Bolognese -- into a ingredient behemoth of a recipe that he would tweak incessantly.

On Bowien's season of Mind of a Chef , he cooks a version of his mapo tofu with lamb for a small consortium of renowned Chinese chefs who resoundingly approve of his non-traditional take. But when Bottura saw the destruction, he declared it beautiful. Everyone in the kitchen stopped as he framed it with his hands and compared it to a painting.

Since the night of that fortuitous accident all lemon tarts now arrive at the tables deliberately smashed, illuminating unexpectedly exquisite imperfection. Chefs are continually driven to experiment and impress, and obsessing over presentation is part of the high-pressure process.

The Oops! I Dropped the Lemon Tart invites chefs and diners to discover splendor in flaws and remind that soulful cooking should always outshine artifices. Chefs and restaurants started celebrating flawed dishes. Year: Restaurant: Taco Bell Irvine, California How it happened: In , as the chain approached its 50th anniversary, CEO Greg Creed issued a modest challenge to his team: reinvent the crunchy taco just in time for the half-century celebration in From day one, a singular idea from their initial brainstorming session -- seemingly hatched from the mind of a stoned teenager with too much time and a well-stocked pantry -- stood out.

It took over 40 iterations before they augmented the chip's DNA enough to land the right level of crunch, strength, and tactile cheese dust. But, as we all know, they nailed it. Why it's important: Don't call it a "stunt food. The Doritos Locos Taco helped redefine how the company innovates its menu, and raised the cheese dust-covered bar for every other fast food brand looking to make a splash with an eye-popping menu aberration or cross-brand collaboration. A staffer suggested he make a donut. So far, he has come up with unique flavors.

When is the last time you saw someone line-up at 4am for a pastry? When was the last time you saw people line up every day for the past five years straight for a pastry? Ansel inadvertently invented the hybrid pastry to launch all future hybrid pastries. From there, I added the Boursin cheese, which was my own personal touch. That makes all the difference. Squires Photo: Courtesy of Petit Trois. But when he announced that the menu was going to be made entirely of food scraps, the world had to pay attention.

For the pop-up, Barber and his team contacted a cold juice processor and realized that the company was throwing away the pulp after making juices. The dish was a hit. The process was a learning experience for Barber about the many different aspects of the food chain and the potential for restaurant kitchens to address food waste. Barber and his team had to get creative and bring other parts of the food world into the conversation. The juice pulp burger, in particular, showed the potential for food waste to be re-imagined and utilized in home and restaurant kitchens.

To say it blew up would be an understatement -- the social video has racked up more than 72 million views on Facebook. Lines wrapped around the corners of The Bagel Store's two Williamsburg locations after the video went live, and the demand became so intense that it forced Rossillo to close one of the shops indefinitely to renovate it's since reopened, but it's no longer an "official" purveyor of the Rainbow Bagel.